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Writing 10 (Fenstermaker): Evaluating Resources

College Reading & Composition - music focus

Credibility

Credibility can help you decide whether or not to trust an information source. 

You may want to consider the following as you evaluate a source:

Scope

  • Does the source provide a general overview of the topic?
  • Does the source focus on only one aspect of the topic?

Audience

  • Who is the source written for? University scholars, general public, high school students?
  • Is the material technical or clinical? What type of information do you need?

Currency

  • When was the source published?
  • If the source is a website, when was it last updated?
  • Do you need the most current information on your subject, or are older publications acceptable?

Website Evaluation (Evaluation of Sources)

Evaluating Websites

When evaluating websites, you may want to keep the following in mind:

  • Is there an author listed for the site?
  • Is the sites sponsored by a group or organization with a specific point of view?
  • Is the site trying to sell you something?
  • Is the site up to date?
  • Are the links credible and authentic?

More information

 

Bias

Questions:

  1. What is the primary problem with bias? 
  2. What other terms can you use to explain unbiased?
  3. What strategies are suggested for detecting bias?